OCAP.gifThe Oregon Climate Action Plan (OCAP) has the potential to be the most sweeping action in state history to transition Oregon to a clean energy economy and take responsibility for our share of the climate crisis. Governor Kate Brown signed OCAP (executive order 20-04) in March 2020, committing the power of the state to reduce greenhouse gas pollution and prioritize equitable climate solutions. 

Now we're fighting to turn words on the page into real pollution reduction and clean energy solutions. Maximizing OCAP’s actions can improve public health, increase equity, and rebuild Oregon-- following multiple crises-- as a resilient, fair economy with good-paying jobs.

One year later, the Oregon Climate Action Plan coalition, a diverse group of stakeholders representing Oregon’s environmental justice, youth, labor, business, advocacy, and culturally-specific communities, presents this progress report for Governor Brown, and the agencies, boards and commissions charged with turning OCAP into reality.

How were issue areas evaluated? Click here to see the method.


The report assesses one year of progress and setbacks in six main areas:

 TRANSPORTATION | CAP & REDUCE | CLEAN ENERGY | CLEAN BUILDINGS | PUBLIC HEALTH | NATURAL & WORKING LANDS

Presented by the Oregon Climate Action Plan Coalition steering committee:READ: Coalition Letter to Governor Kate Brown on the OCAP Progress Report

TRANSPORTATION

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IN DEPTH: Read more about opportunities in Transportation, what's going well and what's not?

CAP & REDUCE

IN DEPTH: Read more about opportunities in Cap & Reduce, what's going well and what's not?

CLEAN ENERGY

IN DEPTH: Read more about opportunities in Clean Energy, what's going well and what's not?

CLEAN BUILDINGS

IN DEPTH: Read more about opportunities in Clean Buildings, what's going well and what's not?

PUBLIC HEALTH

IN DEPTH: Read more about opportunities in Public Health, what's going well and what's not?

NATURAL & WORKING LANDS

IN DEPTH: Read more about opportunities in Natural and Working Lands, what's going well and what's not?