Feb 12, 2016

Oregon Editorial Boards Weigh In: It’s Time to Transition Off Coal

The Clean Electricity and Coal Transition Bill is a hot topic of discussion, and local newspaper editorial boards are weighing in. From Astoria to Medford and beyond, the Coal Transition Bill is receiving widespread support. And why shouldn’t it? Crafted by a diverse set of parties -- from investor-owned electric utilities, to environmental and consumer organizations, and the renewable energy industry -- the bill reflects the interests of all those who will benefit from this game-changing piece of legislation.

Nationwide, the cost of coal is going up, and the price of clean energy is coming down. Climate change poses a major threat to our way of life in Oregon, but also represents a great economic opportunity to harness the power of clean, renewable energy. The Coal Transition Bill offers a common sense approach to this transition, and will make Oregon a national leader in the movement to adopt clean energy. The vote within Oregon’s legislature may still be out, but the verdict among editorial boards is in -- the Clean Electricity and Coal Transition Bill is good for Oregon.

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Ignore the naysayers and pass the no-coal bill (OPINION)

The Oregonian

" We urge the Legislature to pass the Clean Electricity and Coal Transition bill and ensure that Oregon leads the way to a cleaner, more prosperous future."

Why the utilities want to eliminate coal and double renewables in Oregon

Portland Business Journal

"What makes this so urgent? Utilities are planning over long-term horizons. Those are decisions they have to live with for many decades. Energy markets are volatile. Coal markets are kind of collapsing, and no one would have figured that happening 10 years ago." 

Oregon says goodbye to coal

The Register-Guard

“Most Oregonians get it: The age of coal is over. Nations, states and companies that don’t immediately begin a serious transition to non-coal electricity will face a steep upward curve in costs, which will be passed along to consumers and future generations.”

Editorial: Oregon lights a fire under coal power

Daily Astorian

"Most Oregonians get it: The age of coal is over. Nations, states and companies that don’t immediately begin a serious transition to non-coal electricity will face a steep upward curve in costs, which will be passed along to consumers and future generations." 

Getting off of coal

Source Weekly (Bend)

“If coal burning continues, in just one generation, Oregon's snowpack, an essential source of drinking water and farm irrigation, will be significantly reduced. The result will be an escalation in wildfires, flooding, air pollution, pests and species extinction. Get off the killer coal now, Oregon; lead the way for the rest of the world.”

Lawmakers should vote to ban coal in Oregon

Portland Business Journal

”...this plan delivers goals that are acceptable not only to the environmental groups and utilities that crafted it, but to a wide swath or Oregonians who in polls have shown a preference for renewable energy. I hope that lawmakers will recognize this and act accordingly after considering this plan in February.”  

Our Opinion: Coal deal best path to clean energy

Portland Tribune

"As the 2016 Oregon Legislature convenes this week, lawmakers should work to improve — and, ultimately, approve — the energy plan negotiated between Portland General Electric, PacifiCorp and environmental and citizen groups. After reviewing the broad outlines of the deal, the Pamplin newspapers’ editorial board is persuaded that it will protect the vast majority of the two utilities’ customers even as coal-generated energy is eliminated from Oregon’s mix of power supplies.

Our View: Coal phase-out bill gives lawmakers a choice

Medford Mail Tribune

"Coal is clearly on its way out as a source of electric power. Lawmakers can take control of the phase-out process or leave it up to voters and the marketplace."

Why Not a Landmark 2016 Legislative Session?

Willamette Live

“Even in this short session in 2016 the legislature has the opportunity to do something about our inadequate minimum wage laws, and about too much money in Oregon politics, as well as other needed legislation. But what could be more important than doing what needs to be done to help prevent the possible extinction of our species? Everything else pales in comparison.”

Winners, losers in the week's news

The Statesman Journal

“The state's two largest power companies have agreed that by 2030 they will end most use of electricity generated from coal. In return for that commitment by Portland General Electric and Pacific Power, environmental organizations agreed to drop their plans for anti-coal ballot measures. Kudos to both sides.”